Category Archives: sci fi

‘Copied Right’

‘Something odd was happening. The air had been tingling for days; fizzing when he wafted his hand across his face.’  On Readwave now.


Fiction where main character has Down Syndrome

I wonder if the person who arrived here by entering this search term found what they were looking for. Maybe it was ‘If It Ain’t Broke …‘: Robert is a man with Down’s who has to make a choice when he’s offered a chance to go back in time and change his DNA, and he’s here on Ether for download to iPhone or Android devices, or here for on-screen reading. I’ve known a lot of Roberts over the years and I think many of them would recognise the dialogue. For quite a few, the framework for any conversation was a superhero or Dr Who but always with a wry twinkle!

 


‘No Arrests in 2039′ podcast

Do you remember ‘No Arrests in 2039′ on Every Day Fiction? No? Great – it’ll be all fresh when you listen to the podcast then! And you might think twice about falling crime statistics …


Escape Pod flash competition

Escape Pod (podcast)

 

The third EscapePod flash fiction competition opens to voting on September 20th. There are ninety-six SF stories (two of them mine, and no I can’t tell you!) all 750 words or under, competing in ten preliminary rounds. The first three of each go to the semi finals, and the top two from each of these, to the final.  Join EP forums (free) to vote, then stick around for some quality podcasts – three of which you might have chosen yourself! http://escapepod.org/ Obviously, it helps if you like science fiction so if you don’t, while the rest of us put our critic hats on, you get to do maths homework instead. Fair deal?

 


‘Baby Bird': new SF short story

‘I keep thinking we should have left it to die, you know, rather than do what we did …’ on Read Short Fiction today. A tale of a personal road to hell paved with the best of intentions. What choices would you have made?

 


‘Promotion’

Space Station.jpg

Promotion

Fliss compressed her short, squat frame further into the burned out hollow of the hull, shoving Hennessey’s evacuated carcass aside and flicking indeterminate debris casually off her weapons harness. She holed up to consider strategy.

Fliss was a soldier; a grunt on the peri-solar defence ring where killing aliens, not caring platitudes, got you through a shift. She looked down at her uniform, or what passed for one after this morning’s skirmish, and scraped off the residue it had collected from the blast that took out her unit’s communications array. Most of her squad had gone with it and some of the residue was biological but Fliss didn’t much care whose just so long as it wasn’t hers.  She kicked the mess away with her boot, checked out her shoulder mountings for ammunition and headed off into the silence that used to be the galley. One survivor, not human. She shot it without ceremony and moved on, disregarding the plea for help it had registered on its translation device.

Fliss was not given to social communication; few of them here were, thrust out onto the edges of civilisation. How long had it been? Ten years? And had any relief units been sent up? No!  A flicker of anger caught momentarily then disappeared under Fliss’s cold dismissal. She had avoided execution by taking this option and the company of like-minded ‘volunteers’ had proved physically and sexually entertaining. No hardship, she concluded, hefting aside the stinking morass that had been another invader and squirming through the gap in the bulkhead towards the bridge.  She opened a com channel and hissed a command. They’d better be there or she’d make them wish the bastard crawlers had got them. A slight smile curled up one side of her mouth, that might be an entertaining distraction if push came to shove.

The ship hummed and throbbed as its automated repair systems got started on reconstruction. Fliss wiped something viscous off her face and onto her pants and the fabric felt slick with – what? Blood? Vomit? No, lubrication oil, some of the life support gaskets must have blown – shit! She pressed on, the urgency was cranking up; if this tub was holed too seriously…

The bridge was empty. A huge gap in the far skin was sealed now by the emergency force field unit but not before what was left of the crew had been spaced. One body remained, the commander, an honest woman here out of duty. Fliss probed Mackenzie’s top pocket for her ID, lingering momentarily over a breast hardened with rigor – nice tits, shame – then ran the bio-chip through her scan-and-rip software and elevated herself to officer class. Might as well be her family got the compensation payout as anyone else’s she thought.  She stuck the tag into the sub light transfer unit and squatted down next to Mackenzie’s body to wait for the air to run out.

(c) suzanne conboy-hill 2012. First published on PowFastFiction,  October 2010. Sadly, PowFast is now closed so I had to find a new home for this nasty little psychopath before she ran out of aliens and crew-mates.


‘No Arrests in 2039′: you might prefer to walk home …

Out on Every Day Fiction today. Suddenly, I want to know where my council tax goes!

There is actually some science behind this piece of fiction. The Google research car has travelled thousands of miles without incident (see TED talk by Sebastian Thrun), and other vehicles have been driven remotely, including one by Gadget Show presenter Jason Bradbury in a race against an F1 driver. Both cars were live on the track. This set the scene, in my fevered mind at any rate, for a virtual cab company whose ‘drivers’ operate passenger pods from call centres. Then came the idea about what to do with drunken, offensive punters: round ‘em up, wash ‘em down, and – er …

 

 

 

 


Shameless self “Promotion”

Two really exciting things just happened and, right now, I really don’t know which has got me gibbering most. One is an extraordinary convergence in the technologies that will underpin our next research bid (and look out world, if we’re successful, because this will change the way we get information from hospitals and doctors for ever). The other is my first fiction publication outside of the recent NOT competition and it feels like my kid came home from their first day at school with an A* in higher maths! So which to choose? Well, in fairness, there’s no showing off to be had with the research yet as it’s at the ideas stage and will have to be costed til it squeaks to get a sniff at any funding. So that leaves the blatant, unashamed, trumpeting of my lovely (in its mother’s eye) flash piece with its not-so-lovely MC. Find ‘Promotion’ here at the very lovely Powfastfiction.

I thank you (bows dramatically and sweeps off stage leaving wafting evidence of ego-glitter and, in this instance, alien entrails)

 


SF might just have become too dangerous to write

solar system paths

Image by zen via Flickr

Not content with using a pre-discovered planet for a story, I’m a bit bothered I might have stumbled over another cosmic event. I have a story out to a publisher (or on its way back with a note on its collar) about the threads of the universe unravelling and now this

Knot in the ribbon at the edge of the solar system ‘unties’

I’m wondering if I should develop a taste for historical tales before I accidentally destroy life as we know it..wide eyes


That’s my planet!

Gliese 581 e, rocky extrasolar planet.

Image via Wikipedia

Last year, I wrote an SF story about a planet in the Gliese (gleesh) system, first identified in the early 2000s as an extra solar planetary system. Today, the first potentially inhabitable extra solar planet was identified – in the GLIESE system! OK, so my story, ‘Journey Home’, didn’t cut the mustard but heck, there’s got to be points for being on the astronomical button!
Where’s the silly-big-grin icon when you need it?(*). Here’s the story at PopSci. ‘Asimov’s’, you could have had the story first – I know what these people look like!


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,535 other followers

%d bloggers like this: